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Posts Tagged ‘Newborn

Tummy Time Tip5The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends placing babies on their backs to sleep and their tummies to play as part of a daily routine. Just a few minutes a day, a few times a day, can help your baby get used to Tummy Time and help prevent early motor delays. If you begin early (even from just a few days old) and maintain a consistent schedule, your baby will learn to love Tummy Time. This helps develop the muscles in their back, neck, and trunk, on their way to meeting all their infant development milestones.

Tummy Time should begin from the time baby is brought home from the hospital. Try these simple tasks:

  • Create a habit of alternating baby’s position (not location) at least every 20 minutes when baby is awake.
  • Carry baby in arms rather than in a car seat.  Sometimes use the “foot ball” hold and carry baby tummy side down.
  • When changing baby’s diaper, flip him over onto his tummy for 30 seconds  to one minute.
  • Place baby on his tummy on your lap to burp or soothe. A hand on his bottom will help to keep him steady.
  • If bottle feeding, alternate arms to create a more natural hold for baby.
  • When you are awake and alert, lie down and place baby on your tummy or chest.  Until baby can lift her head, alternate her head position for her.  Make sure you keep  your hands on baby at all times.
  • Get down on the floor at eye level with baby.  Be sure to position yourself in different locations around baby to encourage head turning.

Babies don’t always like Tummy Time in the beginning because they have no ability to lift their heads.  However, if you are consistent about doing Tummy Time for short periods all throughout the day, every day, baby will learn to love it!

For additional information on Tummy Time activites and Infant development.  See www.Pathways.org.

Do's and Don'ts of Sling Safety

Do’s and Don’ts of Sling Safety

The Consumer Product Safety Commission has warned parents and caregivers about using a sling for infants younger than 4 months of age, preemies and twins. 

 

Slings can pose two different types of suffocation hazards to babies. In the first few months of life, babies cannot control their heads because of weak neck muscles. The sling’s fabric can press against an infant’s nose and mouth, blocking the baby’s breathing and rapidly suffocating a baby within a minute or two. Additionally, where a sling keeps the infant in a curled position bending the chin toward the chest, the airways can be restricted, limiting the oxygen supply. The baby will not be able to cry for help and can slowly suffocate. 

 CPSC recommends that parents and caregivers make sure the infant’s face is not covered and is visible at all times to the sling’s wearer. If nursing the baby in a sling, change the baby’s position after feeding so the baby’s head is facing up and is clear of the sling and the mother’s body. Parents and caregivers should be vigilant about frequently checking their baby in a sling.

Cultures throughout the world carry babies in slings but correct positioning is crucial.  Follow these simple guidelines:

  1. Always be able to see your baby’s face.
  2. Nose and Mouth should be clear.
  3. Baby’s chin should be up.

When baby is in a sling, baby shares your body heat and has the additional covering of the sling.  Make certain that baby is not too warm.  His or her head should be uncovered.

Enjoy having your baby close!


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