Borchardt Consulting

Posts Tagged ‘Cribs

Safe Sleep14Last year, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) focused their efforts on creating a safe sleep environment for infants.  This year, they continue that effort by focusing on portable play yards.  As of February 28, 2013 all play yards manufactured for sale in the United States must meet mandatory federal safety standard for the first time.

Portable play yards are used by parents, home childcare providers and hotels to provide a safe place for babies to sleep when no full-size crib is available.  Therefore, it is important that portable cribs manufacturing rules be brought into safety compliance also.  The new guidelines will require:

  • Side rails that do not form a sharp V when the product is folded. This prevents a child from strangling in the side rail.
  • Stronger corner brackets to prevent sharp-edged cracks and to prevent a side-rail collapse.
  • Sturdier mattress attachments to the play yard floor to prevent children from getting trapped or hurt.

To ensure that  your baby is in the safest environment possible while left unattended, check that the date of manufacture on your play yard is February  28, 2013 or later.

Thanks to KIDS in Danger and the CPSC for all their hard work in making this new rule.

Advertisements

 

iStock_000014457023XSmall

Do you  have a crib in your baby’s room or basement?  If it was manufactured prior to 2011, it probably isn’t safe. 

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has mandated new standards for full-size and non-full-size baby cribs. The crib standards had not been updated in nearly 30 years.  Further, since 2007, the CPSC has recalled more than 11 million dangerous cribs. 

Once they become effective, the mandatory crib standards will: (1) stop the manufacture and sale of dangerous, traditional drop-side cribs; (2) make mattress supports stronger; (3) make crib hardware more durable; and (4) make safety testing more rigorous.

Effective June 2011, cribs manufactured, sold, or leased in the United States must comply with the new federal standards. Effective December, 2012, child care facilities, such as family child care homes and infant Head Start centers, and places of public accommodation, such as hotels and motels, must have compliant cribs in their facilities.

How do you know if the crib you have meets the latest safety standards?

  1. Marking on the crib shows the date of manufacture is after June 28, 2011.
  2. The crib has a Certificate of Compliance from the manufacturer.

Purchase receipts and registration cards do not prove that the crib is safe.

Before putting your baby down to sleep, check the crib.  Do not put your baby in any crib that you have not personally checked.

For more information on crib safety and safe sleep environments for baby, visit CPSC’s crib information center at: www.cpsc.gov/info/cribs/index.html.

Borchardt Consulting offers classes to childcare providers and parent groups on many of the products that parents ask about for their infants.

Vulnerable Babies Sleep in Pepi-Pod

The 2011 Christchurch New Zealand earthquake created an immediate crisis for the regions vulnerable newborn babies.  There was no safe place for babies to sleep.  This was seen as a public health crisis and the Pepi-Pod was born.  (Pepi means Baby in Maori.) The pēpi-pod package was quickly assembled as an emergency response to the increased risks to babies, posed by disrupted living and sleeping conditions in families, and as support for their fearful parents.  A pepi-pod is a general purpose storage box that converts to a baby sized bed with the addition of an attractive cover, fitting mattress and bedding. It offers babies a safe space when they sleep in, or on, an adult bed, on a couch, in a makeshift setting, or away from home. These are situations with a higher risk of accidental suffocation for babies.

Face Up, Face Clear

Volunteers from all over the country started sewing the covers needed for creating these pods.  Each volunteer used whatever fabric they had available. A complete package of pod, mattress, cover, 2 base sheets, 2 wrap around ‘settling’ sheets, and a double layer merino blanket for each needy family.  Blankets needed to be provided because heat was uncertain in post-quake Christchurch.   Each family receiving a Pepi-Pod received  a thorough safety briefing reinforcing the need to sleep babies on their backs with their faces clear of blankets, smoke-free environment and in their pepi-pod for every sleep.

While I have some concerns about placing these pods in the adult bed, this was a brilliant solution to an immediate public health crisis for infants.  Placing an infant in a pod such as these was certainly safer than placing them on a mattress with the entire family in post-earthquake New Zealand and best of all, to get one, the parents had to have one-on-one safe sleep training.

Last week on Private Practice one of the doctors had a new baby.  Unfortunately, the depiction of the baby’s crib was very unsafe.  This just frosts me!  Safe Sleep practices have been well documented and countless hours are spent by health professionals and not-for-profit organizations trying to spread the word to new parents about the importance of placing baby on his back, alone in a safe crib with no soft bedding.  Then, one television show comes along and wipes out much of that good work.

We know from our research that parents are heavily influenced by advertisements, magazine articles and television shows depicting baby rooms.  When talking with new parents, we hear all about J-Lo’s twins cribs (YIKES), and now this.  Why is it so difficult to incorporate a safe sleep message into these shows.  As the saying goes – a picture is worth a thousand words.  Do you think that you might have noticed if Dr. Montgomery had placed her little Henry down in a crib without bumpers, blankets, pillows, stuffed animals and a hat on his head?

Kudos to the Consumer Product Safety Commision for writing such a well-done letter to those in charge at Private Practice.

By CPSC Blogger on May 1, 2012

Dear Dr. Addison Montgomery,

On last week’s episode of “Private Practice,” we saw that you have a new baby. Congratulations on becoming Henry’s mom! As you’re learning, parenthood is life altering.

You’re clearly a mom who researches and finds the best for her baby, even supplying breast milk from a milk bank. As an obstetrician, however, we would expect you to have researched the latest information about crib safety as well.

Henry's cluttered crib on the ABC TV Show "Private Practice"

This screen grab from “Private Practice” shows baby Henry in his crib

Those blankets and pillows in the crib have to go. Henry doesn’t need the cushioning. His baby needs are different than adult needs like yours. CPSC staff estimates that between 1992 and 2010 there were nearly 700 deaths involving children 12 months and younger related to pillows and cushions. Nearly half of the infant crib deaths and two-thirds of bassinet deaths reported to CPSC each year are suffocations from a baby being placed on top of pillows and thick quilts or because of overcrowding in the baby’s sleeping space.

We are disappointed with the lack of research that went into creating Henry’s nursery, so allow us to help. We have a great video here that can teach you about how to put Henry to sleep safely. While you rightly placed Henry on his back, we did a double take through the TV for all the loose blankets and clutter in Henry’s crib.

In Henry’s — or any baby’s crib — bare is best. As a respected obstetrician watched in millions of homes around the country, we expect better.

Henry needs a firm, flat surface and nothing else.

Even though the pillow in the back of Henry’s crib looks small, pillows are a big problem in cribs. Pillows can block babies’ noses and mouths and can cause them to suffocate. On average, there are 32 infant deaths each year on pillows used as a mattress or to prop babies’ heads. The majority of these deaths are to infants in their first three months of life, just like Henry.

We’re guessing that you covered Henry with all those blankets in a well-meaning way, worried about his temperature. If his room is cold, dress him in warm clothes like footie pajamas. Do not use thick blankets. Babies can and do get their faces stuck in thick blankets and suffocate.

Thanks for taking the time to read and learn about how to make Henry’s crib safer for him. We hope he starts sleeping through the night for you soon!

Sincerely,

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Children’s Safe Sleep Team

Do you ever read the comments at the end of an on-line newspaper article?  I do.  Apparently, lots of people comment on newspaper articles.  Sometimes, those comments just make me want to scream.  I recently read an article from NPR entitled “Co-Sleeping is Back in the News”.

The author, Barbara J. King was commenting upon the fact that a baby died while sleeping in bed with his breastfeeding mother.  The cause of death was listed as “a co-sleeping accident”. This article was a fairly unbiased commentary on co-sleeping.  While there is much about this article that I would choose to comment on, I’ll pass by that for now and go directly to the comments.

nothing is forever  wrote:

responsible parents never roll over their babies it is not optimism but truth if it is not true humans would have been extinct by now…..from time immemorial babies slept with their parents that gives the parents and the child a bond which we is very important. When a baby dies with mother rolling over the baby it is news because it is very uncommon………….

WHAT!  Where do you get your information?  After nearly 20 years of working with newly bereaved parents whose infants have died, it’s not all that uncommon.  Every single day my fax machine will turn on with at least one death report for an infant.  When a baby dies due to an overlay or accidental suffocation, some parents are too grief stricken and guilt-ridden to tell the world.  It is a horrible accident.

Leah  wrote:

I slept in the bed with all three of mine when they were babies and never rolled on any of them. The elephant in the room here is the *size* of the parent, I’d wager.

Wow!  That’s certainly judgmental.   Having your children survive might just make you incredibly lucky – not right. Why is it necessary to vilify parents who experienced a horrible tragedy?  In order to separate yourself (you’re right and they are wrong), it’s apparently necessary to make them fat, drug using, alcoholics.  Research has shown us that some of the reasons that you should NOT bedshare are using  drugs (even over-the counter drugs like cold medication), alcohol,  smoking and being overweight.   But the list is actually much, much longer.  No one wants to be
the bed room police. The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine actually has protocols for breastfeeding mothers to co-sleep.  You can check them out here.

Brow Master wrote:

You don’t need a doctors opinion on this just listen to your own mother or grandmother.

I’m sure that your mother would be happy to hear that you believe she is always right; however, changes in childrearing occur because research
continues to give us more information, new products are discovered and even our children change. I’d wager that your mother did not put her children in a car seat.  There was probably lead paint on the crib that she used.  I played on construction sites, drank out of garden hoses and ate white bread with butter and sugar for lunch, but I certainly wouldn’t want my grandchildren to do that.

Jerry wrote:

From an evolutionary perspective, survival requires co-sleeping. For most of human history, sleeping away from your parents would most likely result in your becoming food for predators.

I wonder if the any of the studies factor in the size of the mother. There are some women walking around here even I wouldn’t feel safe sleeping next to.

Excellent point – Evolution. Defined as  1. any process of formation or growth; development. 2. A product of such development. 3. Biology.
Change in the gene pool of a population from generation to generation by such processes as mutation, natural selection, and genetic drift. 4. A process of gradual, peaceful, progressive change or development, as in social or economic structure or institutions.

In short, evolution means change.  I can’t speak for everyone, but in my neighborhood, I don’t have to worry about lions eating my children.  We have heat in our home so I don’t have to keep them close for heat.  I sleep in an America style comfortable bed, not on a dirt floor.  Sometimes, we outgrow our evolutionary history.  Some call that progress.  As to the other point about a woman’s weight – that’s just mean.  Most women who have recently given birth to a baby are carrying a bit of extra weight.

Candida  wrote:

I am sorry for this mother though it may be that the baby would have still passed or passed sooner had it been in a crib. The majority of the worlds culture co-sleep.

Back to that.  I don’t live in a third-world country (most of the world’s population).  Also, please don’t ever say something like
that to a bereaved parent.  We all die eventually but you have no way of knowing that this baby would die under other circumstances.

jpett88 wrote:

“3 million years of human evolution have prepared you for it.”

My favorite product of millions years of human evolution is the frontal cortex of the brain, which allows [most] humans to think rationally. It’s why we buckle our seatbelts in cars. Why we avoid drinking antifreeze. And probably why we shouldn’t sleep in the same bed as our babies, given the evidence. Bed-sharing is probably on par with opting out of vaccinations. Low risk but
high stakes. It’s a parenting choice, of course.

There are no right answers. Just safer answers.

AMEN! Excellent answer!  There are no right answers.  Just safer answers.  As a parent, you get to decide for your family what works best for you.  Consider, are you putting the comfort of the parents ahead of the safety of the child?   Babies are dying – unnecessarily.  As the parent, you get to chose what is right for your baby and for your family.  Make an informed choice and don’t for a minute think that it only happens to “bad” people.  It happens in every racial, ethnic, economic group.  It happens to loving parents who desperately wanted a baby.  Luckily, it doesn’t happen to most of us.  But, most people do know someone who has had a baby die.  That family deserves your sympathy, empathy and support.  Not your judgment.

When you are a mother, you are never really alone in your thoughts. A mother always has to think twice, once for herself and once for her child.   Sophia Loren, from Women and Beauty

Cribs We Dream About Aren't Always Safe

Dr. Rachel Moon’s study on parental beliefs is really enlightening for educators who are trying to make parents aware of the safest sleep environment for baby.

Our babies need to sleep on a soft cloud.  Where did this belief come from?  In the last 20 years, we have introduced more and more soft fluffy items into our infants world.  In an effort to make that world cute and inviting for our baby’s, we have forgotten that most basic tenet – keep them safe.

I blame product manufacturers and magazines.  For women, after we’ve finished dreaming about our wedding, we start dreaming about what our babies room will look like.  We pour through catalogs and wander through the baby section of stores dreaming and imagining how our precious dream baby will look.

The realities are much harsher.  The crib is the one place that baby spends a lot of unsupervised time.  It must be the safest space in your home to place a baby and leave here unattended.  Soft + Comfortable does not equal safe.

Study highlights continuing dangers of soft bedding.

I have been warning parents for several years that sleep positioners are not safe in the infant sleep environment.  Finally, the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Food & Drug Administration have issued their own warning.

If you have an infant or you know anyone that cares for infants (especially less than four months old), please pass this information along.

Deaths prompt CPSC, FDA warning on infant sleep positioners.


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Join 299 other followers

Safe Sleep Baby

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Miss an Article?

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: